Achieving the Dream Through Education Communities

Indigenous Youth Need Your Support! – Providing indigenous youth with financial assistance to access their dream through education.

When you donate, you are giving more than money. You are providing Matawa youth with the means to realize their full potential and empower them to make life-changing choices that impact them and their community. By creating a bursary, you are offering them access to post-secondary education; when you support a fund, these dollars enhance their learning opportunities. When you provide resources for clothing, computers, sports equipment and art supplies, you are making a difference one student at a time!

Donate Today

Achieving the Dream Through Education on Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Cover for Achieving The Dream Through Education
Achieving The Dream Through Education

Achieving The Dream Through Education

148

ATDTE is devoted to supporting and improving the lives of Matawa First Nations youth.

We congratulate Ciarra Roy for being awarded the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary!

Ciarra is a member of Constance Lake First Nation in Treaty 9 Territory. Last spring, she studied Indigenous Studies with a minor in Legal Studies at Simon Frazier University. She is currently in the Common Law/Indigenous Legal Orders JD/JID at the University of Victoria and will enter her second year (2L) in the fall. 

When Ciarra completes her program, she hopes to use her knowledge of various areas of law to help Indigenous communities and nations in various ways. This could include substantiating traditional legal orders and knowledge, legal representation for environmental projects, land acquisition, and inherent rights.

Congratulations Ciarra!

#indigenous #bursary #indigenousbursary #education #achievingthedreamthrougheducation #postsecondaryeducation #matawaeducation #dream

We congratulate Ciarra Roy for being awarded the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary!

Ciarra is a member of Constance Lake First Nation in Treaty 9 Territory. Last spring, she studied Indigenous Studies with a minor in Legal Studies at Simon Frazier University. She is currently in the Common Law/Indigenous Legal Orders JD/JID at the University of Victoria and will enter her second year (2L) in the fall.

When Ciarra completes her program, she hopes to use her knowledge of various areas of law to help Indigenous communities and nations in various ways. This could include substantiating traditional legal orders and knowledge, legal representation for environmental projects, land acquisition, and inherent rights.

Congratulations Ciarra!

#indigenous #bursary #indigenousbursary #education #achievingthedreamthrougheducation #postsecondaryeducation #matawaeducation #dream
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Wtg Ciarra, keep up the great work! πŸ‘πŸ½

Thank you again for the support!

Congratulations Ciarra! πŸŽ‰πŸ‘

We are looking forward to sharing information with our social media community about some sacred Indigenous teachings, medicines, foods, and other elements that are important to Matawa. This knowledge offers a glimpse into the rich cultural heritage and traditions of Indigenous peoples.

The information we share is only a small portion of the many extensive sacred Indigenous teachings and protocols. Its important to recognize that these teachings vary from community to community and from one geographic region to another.

For a more comprehensive understanding, please consult a Traditional Elder, Healer, or Medicine Person. Their wisdom and guidance are invaluable for truly appreciating and respecting the Indigenous cultural practices we seek to share. 

Sweetgrass is the last sacred medicine that we are going to share!

Sweetgrass, the sacred hair of mother earth, is braided with three strands, each representing one of the seven grandfather teachings. Its calming aroma of love and gentleness mirrors the spiritual essence shared with sage, cedar, and tobacco, forming the four sacred medicines. Sweetgrass is known for its benefits of calming anxiety and used to ground yourself again. The aroma smell reminds love, calmness, and to be gentle.

Sweetgrass, known as the sacred hair of mother earth, is braided with three strands symbolizing the seven grandfather teachings. At α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations  students learn about sweetgrasss cultural significance and its health benefits.

We are looking forward to sharing information with our social media community about some sacred Indigenous teachings, medicines, foods, and other elements that are important to Matawa. This knowledge offers a glimpse into the rich cultural heritage and traditions of Indigenous peoples.

The information we share is only a small portion of the many extensive sacred Indigenous teachings and protocols. It's important to recognize that these teachings vary from community to community and from one geographic region to another.

For a more comprehensive understanding, please consult a Traditional Elder, Healer, or Medicine Person. Their wisdom and guidance are invaluable for truly appreciating and respecting the Indigenous cultural practices we seek to share.

Sweetgrass is the last sacred medicine that we are going to share!

Sweetgrass, the sacred hair of mother earth, is braided with three strands, each representing one of the seven grandfather teachings. Its calming aroma of love and gentleness mirrors the spiritual essence shared with sage, cedar, and tobacco, forming the four sacred medicines. Sweetgrass is known for its benefits of calming anxiety and used to ground yourself again. The aroma smell reminds love, calmness, and to be gentle.

Sweetgrass, known as the sacred hair of mother earth, is braided with three strands symbolizing the seven grandfather teachings. At α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations students learn about sweetgrass's cultural significance and its health benefits.
... See MoreSee Less

7 days ago
We want to acknowledge and congratulate all the winners of Matawa Education & Care Centre End of the Year Awards. These awards are meant to encourage students to perform their best. 

These awards are given to @α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations students for their hard work, dedication, and ability to continue their education through difficult circumstances. Some presented awards include the attendance award, the athlete of the year award, and awards of recognition in different subjects.

Thank you to the staff, volunteers, and donors who could make this event possible.

This year, 27 awards were handed out and everyone is extremely proud of the students accomplishments. We hope everyone has a wonderful summer. 

#endofyearawards #classof2024 #education #matawaeducation #indigenous #indigenouscharity #awards #achievingthedreamthrougheducation #achieveImage attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

We want to acknowledge and congratulate all the winners of Matawa Education & Care Centre End of the Year Awards. These awards are meant to encourage students to perform their best.

These awards are given to @α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations students for their hard work, dedication, and ability to continue their education through difficult circumstances. Some presented awards include the attendance award, the athlete of the year award, and awards of recognition in different subjects.

Thank you to the staff, volunteers, and donors who could make this event possible.

This year, 27 awards were handed out and everyone is extremely proud of the student's accomplishments. We hope everyone has a wonderful summer.

#endofyearawards #classof2024 #education #matawaeducation #indigenous #indigenouscharity #awards #achievingthedreamthrougheducation #achieve
... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago
It is with great sadness that we share the loss of one of our colleagues, Barb Rabbit. Barb was the Registration Administrator and Membership Clerk for the α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations. Barb was someone who was always filled with life and happiness.

On July 5th, α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations hosted their annual staff golf tournament. Barb was always a fan of the tournament and brought her smile, wonderful spirit, and photography skills.

With Barbs passing and her love for the golf tournament, the Matawa Staff Golf Tournament will now be called the Barb Rabbit Memorial Golf Tournament. 
We continue to keep her family in our thoughts and prayers.

It is with great sadness that we share the loss of one of our colleagues, Barb Rabbit. Barb was the Registration Administrator and Membership Clerk for the α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations. Barb was someone who was always filled with life and happiness.

On July 5th, α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations hosted their annual staff golf tournament. Barb was always a fan of the tournament and brought her smile, wonderful spirit, and photography skills.

With Barb's passing and her love for the golf tournament, the Matawa Staff Golf Tournament will now be called the Barb Rabbit Memorial Golf Tournament.
We continue to keep her family in our thoughts and prayers.
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

1 CommentComment on Facebook

I hope the staff at INAC at The FWFN were given notice about it. When I went there Tuesday morning this week, one of the ladies who work there was shocked to hear of her passing. They didn’t know until I informed them she passed on πŸ’ .

Shaylins journey is a testament to human resilience, showing how hope can triumph over adversity. In June 2023, she embarked on a healing journey that led to personal growth and academic success. Now pursuing a degree in Behavioral Psychology, Shaylins story, recognized through the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary inspires others to persevere through hardship.

Donating to the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary supports students facing obstacles and fosters a community where dreams are achievable. Your contribution cultivates future leaders who will positively impact their communities and beyond.

#indigenouseducation #indigenous #indigenoussuccess #indigenous #education #universitystudent #indigenouscharity #indigenousscholarships #indigenousbursary #donation

Shaylin's journey is a testament to human resilience, showing how hope can triumph over adversity. In June 2023, she embarked on a healing journey that led to personal growth and academic success. Now pursuing a degree in Behavioral Psychology, Shaylin's story, recognized through the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary inspires others to persevere through hardship.

Donating to the The Courage (Alex Missewace) Bursary supports students facing obstacles and fosters a community where dreams are achievable. Your contribution cultivates future leaders who will positively impact their communities and beyond.

#IndigenousEducation #indigenous #IndigenousSuccess #indigenous #education #universitystudent #IndigenousCharity #indigenousscholarships #indigenousbursary #donation
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

Aww congratulations πŸŽ‰ my niece

CONGRATS SHAY 🀍πŸ₯Ή

We are looking forward to sharing information with our social media community about some sacred Indigenous teachings, medicines, foods, and other elements that are important to Matawa. This knowledge offers a glimpse into the rich cultural heritage and traditions of Indigenous peoples.

The information we share is only a small portion of the many extensive sacred Indigenous teachings and protocols. Its important to recognize that these teachings vary from community to community and from one geographic region to another.

For a more comprehensive understanding, please consult a Traditional Elder, Healer, or Medicine Person. Their wisdom and guidance are invaluable for truly appreciating and respecting the Indigenous cultural practices we seek to share.

Sage, one of the Ojibwes four sacred medicines and is valued for its cleansing properties and ability to release negative energy. Introduced from the west via train, it has become integral to Ojibwe practices.

Sage is commonly used to prepare ceremonies and teachings. Sage is used as a cleansing medicine because it releases and removes negative energy that may be troubling. Ways individuals use sage are for when they are cleansing their home, clear their senses, and as medicine. In the land of the Ojibwe people, sage was not originally from our area, it came from out west. Before Ojibwe just used to use Cedar. Once train transportation came into play, thats how sage migrated its way to Ojibwe Territory. There are also female and male sage. Female sage has bud leafs while male sage is loose leaf.

#sage #indigenous #foursacredmedicines #indigenouscharity #spirit #ojibwe

α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations teaches students about sages cultural significance, its historical introduction to Ojibwe territory, and its practical uses for cleansing and ceremonies.

We are looking forward to sharing information with our social media community about some sacred Indigenous teachings, medicines, foods, and other elements that are important to Matawa. This knowledge offers a glimpse into the rich cultural heritage and traditions of Indigenous peoples.

The information we share is only a small portion of the many extensive sacred Indigenous teachings and protocols. It's important to recognize that these teachings vary from community to community and from one geographic region to another.

For a more comprehensive understanding, please consult a Traditional Elder, Healer, or Medicine Person. Their wisdom and guidance are invaluable for truly appreciating and respecting the Indigenous cultural practices we seek to share.

Sage, one of the Ojibwe's four sacred medicines and is valued for its cleansing properties and ability to release negative energy. Introduced from the west via train, it has become integral to Ojibwe practices.

Sage is commonly used to prepare ceremonies and teachings. Sage is used as a cleansing medicine because it releases and removes negative energy that may be troubling. Ways individuals use sage are for when they are cleansing their home, clear their senses, and as medicine. In the land of the Ojibwe people, sage was not originally from our area, it came from out west. Before Ojibwe just used to use Cedar. Once train transportation came into play, thats how sage migrated its way to Ojibwe Territory. There are also female and male sage. Female sage has bud leafs while male sage is loose leaf.

#sage #indigenous #foursacredmedicines #IndigenousCharity #spirit #ojibwe

α’ͺα‘•α§αŠ Matawa First Nations teaches students about sage's cultural significance, its historical introduction to Ojibwe territory, and its practical uses for cleansing and ceremonies.
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago
Load more